A Line Dresses

A line dresses are a classic look and hugely popular because they are flattering on almost all heavy busted body types. They are versatile and can be short or long, formal or casual and come in many different styles and fabrics.

A style that was very popular in the 50's means that you will often see A line dresses referred to as 'retro'. You will find that some styles flare out from below the bust, whereas others from the waist. Indeed, many retailers refer to fit and flare dresses.

Are they flattering dresses for big busts? Very much so. As the examples shown by the big busted celebrities in the right hand column demonstrate. Why? Principally because that wide flouncy skirt balances out a large chest.

Missmay® Women's Vintage 1950s Style 3/4 Sleeve Black Lace Flare A-line Dress
Glamour Empire Women's 3/4 Sleeve V-Neck Jersey Dress

What Is An A Line Dress?

What is an A Line dress?

A 'simple' definition might be, a fitted top with a flared bottom which is widest at the hemline. It is not difficult to see why it is called an A line because it resembles the capital letter A.

I say simple definition above because this is actually a far more complicated term than it might seem.

Technically it is any dress that flares out from the top to form a letter A shape but generally it has come to mean a fitted bodice type element with a skirt flaring out from the waist which is often knee length.

ACEVOG Vintage 1950's Floral Spring Garden Party Dress
Miusol Women's Vintage Breast Dart V-Ncek A-line Skirts Big Swing Tea Blue Dresses

A Brief History Of A Line Dresses

A stamp of Royal Approval

They say there is nothing new under the sun, particularly in the world of fashion. However A line dresses, as we now know them, first really stamped their mark in the 1950's. 

The actual term, A line dress, is commonly attributed to Christian Dior and his Spring 1955 collection but the style was already popular as demonstrated (above) by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth 2nd on a 1954 trip to Australia.

The style remained popular throughout the 50s, 60's and 70's but faded a little in the 80s, 90s and noughties as the world of fashion fixated on super slim silhouettes.

Indeed it is now most often found in retro collections which seems bizarre as it is such a good look for many different body shapes.

This typifies the difference between fashion and style. Fashion is simply what is de rigeur at any given point in time. Style is wearing clothes that both fit and flatter your shape and this little number will most likely do that.

What Body Types Suit A Line Dresses?

This is a style that really suits pear shaped, rectangle and hourglass figures. Because the bulk is in the bottom half it flares out over big hips and bottoms and the assumption from the onlooker is that any bulk is the dress not the wearer.

  • It is therefore particularly good for pear shaped ladies who would prefer to de-emphasise or draw attention from their bottom. Dare I say I love this style. 
  • Equally the tight waist band is good for hourglass shaped women as it emphasises their small waists and highlights those curves.
  • Similarly it provides the illusion of extra curves for rectangle shape, straight or athletic figures.
  • Finally, it suits any big boobed woman as the bulk at the bottom balances the bulk at the top.

Some Attractive Examples
Currently Online

Below are some examples of different styles to give you some ideas: 

A line dresses for big busts Phase 8 Annie
Anne Klein Women's Short-Sleeve Fit-and-Flare Dress with Neck Trim

Above left is the Annie fit and flare occasion dress from Phase 8. Not cheap but dead classy. It has a black mesh overlay with embroidered detail on the bodice and shoulders. There is a waistband for added definition in UK dress sizes 6 - 20.

To the right is what is described as a fit and flare dress. With short sleeves and a V neck notch at the neckline. As you can see, the hemline can lie just over or below the knee and still give that A shape.

Skater dress for the voluptuous
Tom's Ware Womens Casual Fit and Flare Floral Sleeveless Dress

I wanted to provide two slightly different styles here.

The example on the left may not technically even be classified as A line, indeed Fashion World themselves describe it as a skater dress. The reason I show it is because they specifically sell what they describe as 'voluptuous' fits; either B-DD, E-GG, H-K. You just have to love anyone who is clearly catering for big bazungas.

I wanted to show this floral frock because it is strapless. It has a deep round neck and it looks perfect for casual Sumer or Spring wear.

Glamour Empire Women's Sleeveless Circle Skater Flattering Summer Dress
Plus size print prom dress

I liked the crimson A line dress above because of it's simplicity. A deep waistband to create a waist is always flattering to curvy figures, especially pear shapes. Sizes up to UK 20 and lots of colour choices but all monochrome. With the ever popular V neckline for ladies of bountiful dimensions.

Finally, I thought it would be useful to show a floral print prom dress in a heavyweight cotton sateen fabric. I wanted to show this as Fashion World provide it in sizes up to 24. It has a sweetheart neckline, netting in the skirt and mesh sleeves to cover the upper arms.

A Line Skirts

A line skirts are a little different because they flare straight from the waist. The term A line dresses is a term sometimes used to describe garments that flare out from the shoulder line, first popularized by Yves Saint Laurent but it is safer to describe that style as a Trapeze line.

Dani's Choice Stretch High Waist A-line Flared Long Skirt
Allegra K Women Vintage High Waist Jacquard Flare Pleated Swing Full Skirt

As you can see this style skirt can be short or long. Choose what suits you. As you can see, these A line skirts could easily be worn for work.

The traditional method is to use a heavier fabric which tends to retain it's shape and thereby maintain the A line look but this is not always the case.

To return to the top, go to A line dresses

To see more stlyish dresses for big busts, click the link

For the home page, see clothes for busty women




Did you like this page, did you learn something, maybe it reinforced you own views? I want to give as much (hopefully helpful) advice to the busty sisterhood as I can.

Please remember, we are all different. You may like to wear certain clothes and styles which I am suggesting that you should not. That is your absolute right. Do what makes you feel good. This site undeniably goes for the more modest approach because I feel all busty ladies already know how to be more racy if they wish.

It would really help me improve the site profile if you would click the Facebook 'Like' button. Pretty please! Susan

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Sofia Vergara in an A-Line dressSofia Vergara


Are These Dresses For Big Busts?

Christina Hendricks

The quick answer is, generally yes.

Do A Line dresses suit big busts?Christina Hendricks

I often think Christina Hendricks misses a trick by concentrating on flashing her boobs too much. However, I think she looks absolutely lovely in this and it just shows how A line dresses can suit seriously curvy women.


Kat Dennings

Kat Dennings in an A Line dress

Kat Dennings also proves that this style suits the big busted younger generation.

Again note how modest she looks. No hint of massive boobage and yet it promotes her curves. No surprise here because this is a young woman that really understands style. Check out a page dedicated to her at: Kat Dennings Photos


Kim Kardashian

Kim Kardashian in a strapless A line dress

Miss Kardashian who is certainly very curvy also looks very stylish in an A line dress.


Monica Bellucci

Monica Bellucci in an A line dress

Monica Bellucci another lady who is constantly searching for suitable dresses for big busts, understands that the right dress can flatter the whole figure and adds a sun hat to emphasise the fact that she is in warm weather mode.



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Susan